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Issue #682 January 2013




Feature Articles

Three select articles will be offered in their entirety each month, available to all visitors.

AMANO T 0113 A Method of Using Unattractive Driftwood
Author: Takashi Amano
PURS T 0113 Adding Color to the Freshwater Aquarium: Going for Gold (Full Article)
The glowing, sun-like radiance of gold and ...
Author: Philip Purser
MICH T 0113 Building a Heron Island Biotope, Part 1: Natural History of the Reef (Full Article)
Every marine fish brings baggage with it from ...
Author: Scott Michael
MADD T 0113 Easy Tetras for the Beginner Community Tank
Author: Lea Maddocks
RICC T 0113 Making History: How to Describe a New Species
Author: Francesco Ricciardi
BEDN T 0113 Trouble-Free Dwarf Cichlids (Full Article)
The majority of Apistogramma spp. are ...
Author: Radek Bednarczuk

Columns

Available exclusively to TFH Magazine subscribers (print and digital)

AIA T 0113 An Elegant 5(1/2)-Gallon Nano, Part 1: Preplanning
Author: Frank Wazeter
AJ T 0113 Ask Jack
Author: Jack Wattley
PT T 0113 Exciting New Bornean Aroids
Author: Amanda Wenger
LWL T 0113 Expendition to McCauley Spring
Author: Charles Clapsaddle
CICH T 0113 Hemichromis lifalili: A Long-Lasting Case of Mistaken Identity
Author: Ted Judy
TSM T 0113 Surgeonfishes of the Genus Zebrasoma
Author: James Fatherree
ITL T 0113 The Reproduction of Dwarf Red Bettas
Author: Mark Denaro

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Cover T 0113

About the Cover

Choosing an appropriate fish to add to a reef tank can be a daunting task because the fish in the community must not only get along with each other, but also with the myriad inverts in the tank as well. Luckily the sailfin tang makes the choice easy—as long as your reef is large enough, these fish are peaceful, hardy, beautiful, and even helpful, since they consume filamentous algae. Learn more about sailfins and other tangs from the genus Zebrasoma in James Fatherree’s review of these wonderful fishes (p. 48). Photo by Sabine Penisson


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Species Profiles

FOM T 0112 Black molly
Describer: N/A

Tip of the Month:

Unless you have very soft water, you will eventually have to deal with "lime" buildup. When water evaporates, dissolved minerals are left behind as a white film or crust. A razor blade can remove much of the deposit, but this will scratch plastic badly. An easier and dust-free method for glass, plastic, or any other surface is to use a scrubbing pad dampened with household vinegar. The dilute acid quickly dissolves the minerals, and a thorough rinse removes any remaining vinegar.

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