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Issue #657 December 2010

Feature Articles

Three select articles will be offered in their entirety each month, available to all visitors.

HUNT T 1210 Cirrhilabrus: The Fairy Wrasses (Full Article)
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Author: Phillip Hunt
SUNG T 1210 A New Cichlid Species from Uruguay: Gymnogeophagus tiraparae
Author: Ivan Gonzalez, Marcelo Loureiro, Sebastian Oviedo, and Stan Sung
AMANO T 1210 Driftwood Structure in the Nature Aquarium (Full Article)
One major characteristic of a Nature Aquarium ...
Author: Takashi Amano
LANG T 1210 From San Francisco to Milwaukee: The Great Pacu Project
Author: Tom Lang
JUDY T 1210 Large Tetras of West Africa
Author: Ted Judy
DUNL T 1210 Leaves for Aquaria (Full Article)
I have been using various species of dead ...
Author: Colin Dunlop
DEMAS T 1210 Safety First! Basic Aquarium Equipment Precautions
Author: Paul Demas
BREED T 1210 The TFH Breeder’s Challenge Part 12
Author: Ted Judy and Mike Hellweg

Columns

Available exclusively to TFH Magazine subscribers (print and digital)

AIA T 1210 A 40-Gallon Amano-Style Tank, Part 4
Author: Jason Baliban
A Tank for the Holidays
Author: Rhonda Wilson
AJ T 1210 Ask Jack
Author: Jack Wattley
IR T 1210 Import Report
Author: Mark Denaro
Redtails Xenotoca eiseni
Author: Ivan Dibble
TR T 1210 The Fabulous Fluted Clam
Author: James Fatherree, MsC

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About the Cover

Beautiful colors, elaborate finnage, and a substantial size (4 inches) make the Congo tetra Phenacogrammus interruptus an extremely popular fish. A school of these handsome fish can be the star attraction in a large community aquarium. And yes, those are teeth in our cover model’s mouth! This is the only African tetra regularly produced by commercial hatcheries, and one of the species covered this month in Ted Judy’s “Large Tetras of West Africa” (p. 62).


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Species Profiles

FOM T 1210 Pterophyllum altum
Describer: PELLEGRIN 1903
Lagenandra meeboldii “pink”
Describer: N/A

Tip of the Month:

That mudskippers, those amphibious gobies that scurry around on the shore and climb mangrove roots to get insects, cannot breathe air? They carry water in a pouch around their gills, keeping those organs wet, so they can continue to extract oxygen---sort of "wet-dry gills"!

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