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Breeding Common Fish

by TFH Magazine on February 12, 2010 at 11:52 am

By Mike Hellweg

As promised, I spent some time in a couple of local big box stores and a couple of local fish stores. In both big box stores the pickings were mighty slim for me— mostly big fish like cichlids. But there were a few nice small fish from which I selected some potential breeding stock.

The local fish stores were even better. I was able to go into one and find several pairs of tetras and barbs that were old enough for spawning. Even better, in one I was able to get them all on sale at a huge discount! And in the other, I was able to trade a bunch of young fish from the contest for several pairs and a couple of breeding groups that were almost ready to go. This illustrates one of the great reasons to support your local shop—I was able to trade in some of my breeders to one local shop and get a couple more species in exchange.

So in a couple of hours, with a couple of stops, spending only about $25, I re-homed a large number of fish and brought home enough fish to keep me busy for at least a couple of weeks in the contest.

Obviously, all of the fish, even those I get from friends, go into quarantine first. No sense introducing disease into an established tank.

Here are some of the fish I found:

Cichlids:

Pseudocrenilabrus philander

Livebearers and Killies:

Wild-type green swordtails Xiphophorus hellerii

Coral red platies Xiphophorus sp. domestic platy

Sunset variatus Xiphophorus sp. domestic variatus

Catfish:

Corydoras narcissus (marked as skunk cories – Corydoras arcuatus)

Corydoras paleatus

Egg Scatterers:

Pearl danio Danio albolineatus – these were on sale for just 11 cents each!

Zebra danio Danio rerio – 11 cents each!

Blue danio Danio sp. – 11 cents each!

Fireline danio Devario sondhi

Black skirt tetra Gymnocorymbus ternetzi

Silvertip tetra Hasemania nana

Glowlight tetra Hemigrammus erythrozonus

Head and tail light tetra Hemigrammus ocellifer

Pretty tetra Hemigrammus pulcher

Ember tetra Hyphessobrycon amandae

Columbian redfin blue tetra Hyphessobrycon columbianus

Sickle fin tetra Hyphessobrycon robertsi

Serpae tetra Hyphessobrycon serpae

Neon tetra Paracheirodon innesi

Tiger barb Puntius anchisporus

Melon barb Puntius melanampyx

Black ruby barb Puntius nigrofasciatus

Gold barb Puntius semifasciolatus or Puntius “sachsi”

White cloud mountain minnow Tanichthys albonubes

Penguin tetras Thayeria obliqua

Anabantoids:

Honey gouramis Colisa chuna

Pearl gouramis Trichogaster leeri

Gold gouramis Trichogaster trichopterus

Marine Fish:

Tank Raised Bangaii Cardinals Pterapogon kauderni

And a group of spotted loaches – no idea what species they are but they are easily sexable, so I’ll keep my fingers crossed!

Since Ted mentions it, I’ll stress again how important quarantine is to success with aquarium fish. Several of the neon tetras and fireline danios came down with ich soon after arriving home. It is likely the cold weather somewhere in transit, either at the airport here before they made it to the shop, or in the delivery truck stressed them and made them susceptible. Fortunately, I followed my normal procedure and put the new fish in quarantine tanks. The ich only affected two of those tanks. I was able to treat it immediately since I was watching for it, and only lost a couple of fish. The rest came through with flying colors. Of course this sets any breeding attempts with those two species back several weeks as they will need time to recover. But I’ve got plenty of fish to work with for the next few weeks.

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Posted in Breeder's Challenge and Mike Hellweg by TFH Magazine on February 12th, 2010 at 11:52 am.

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  1. You bought ALL of those? Criky…..


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